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Brown Sugar

 

As if one trophy wasn't enough, this two-year project by the crew at Classic Cycles, netted owner Steve Lacy three awards at the 2010 Grand National Roadster Show; 1st. Place in Class, Outstanding Detail - Motorcycle, Best Overall Motorcycle. The entire look of the bike is surely unique, a far cry from cookie-cutter Triumph customs, but it's the amount and quality of the details that really make it special.

 

 

As if one trophy wasn't enough, this two-year project by the crew at Classic Cycles, netted owner Steve Lacy three awards at the 2010 Grand National Roadster Show; 1st. Place in class, Outstanding detail - motorcycle, Best Overall motorcycle. The overall look of the bike is unique for sure, a far cry from cookie-cutter Triumph customs, but it's the amount and quality of the details that make this bike special.
Owner:
Steve Lacy- Long Beach, CA 
Builder:
Classic Cycles Inc, Orange, CA
Bike name:
"Brown Sugar"
Engine, year and make, model, modifications:
1964 Triumph TR6/650cc
Andy added a 1969 Intake Cam and 1970 Exhaust cam for a bit snappier response.
Clutch and primary belt drive from Bob Newby Racing installed. Drive-side cover opened precisely over the pressure plate. It got a brushed finish, topped off with polished nuts. Tony shaved, heated, bent and braised BSA A65 pipes so they would replace the stock exhaust. Then the head ends were flanged to fit the Triumph spigots. Steve requested a 21-tooth drive sprocket in the transmission. Oil feed to the rockers features exposed copper junction and fittings. Rocker box fin edges are polished
Frame:
Flyrite Loner- 4" over. Steve wanted a 19/400 tires on 19-inch wheels front and back. So something had to give at the rear. The cross member under the seat was scooped out so the fender could move forward and allow that larger radius. That cavity was also used to hide a fender attachment. The frame’s axle plates were modified to take Triumph axle and chain adjusters. 
Fork:
It's a one-of-a-kind springer that started as a "Shorty" manufactured by DNA for Flyright Choppers. A lot of sweat went into the cutting, milling, scaling, and modifying needed for the transformation. Tony also fabbed an elegant stainless brake stay to connect the fork with a 7" twin leading shoe brake hub. Welding, polishing and plating made the rocker/stay combo a handsome, integrated component.  Finally, Tony moved the rockers from outside to inside the fork legs to flesh out that interior space.
Chassis mods:
Extensive shaping and molding as well as rear axle plate modifications for Triumph style rear axle. and the stylized gas  and oil tank mounts and custom head steady.
Tire/wheel size and style:
400/19 Firestone's front and rear on Triumph hubs
Favorite things about this bike: 
The theme of the sweeping BSA exhaust pipes was carried out through many of the design features, like the hand made points cover the custom motor mounts and even the gussets on the gas and oil tank mounts and the sweeping lines of the paint design.  I like the 7" Twin leading shoe mounted on a  springer, the Bob Newby belt drive in a open primary cover, the no battery electronics with a micro switch brake light switch and the LED tail light.  the Hollywood handle bars, also the custom "1950's Smiths Revolater" speedometer and mount, the look and the feel of custom made Roberti seat with a Biltwell seat mount, I like some of the little touches like the exposed brass fittings on the oil feed, and the petcocks on a Bonneville gas tank with knee pads.
This bike has lots of high quality paint work with minimum amount of chrome and then keeping the engine in a clean stock appearance with tiny custom touches like the polished edges on the head and rockerboxes.
Next modification will be:
Chips and dings from the owner riding the hell out of it.
Other mods, accessories, cool parts, etc:
Tony routed electrical wiring through the frame for a clean appearance. The battery got tossed by using a Boyer Power Box. It provides direct current straight from the alternator. A built-in delay circuit only sends current to the lighting only once the engine is running and the ignition is fully powered. A Smiths chronometric speedometer with a revulator face plate is fitted to a custom mount fabricated by Classic Cycles. (absent in these photos). Triumph front fender mounts were joined with hand-shaped round stock to create a fender strut that suggests the appearance of a factory original.
Special thanks to T Markus Customs in N. Hollywood who did the killer paint job. Tony Markus did a great job of "dialing in" Steve's ideas to deliver a really tasteful finish on the bike.  www.tmarkus.com
 
A couple notes from Steve, about his bike:
She's like the girl who's pretty, but not in a conventional way. She doesn't dress like the popular girls either. But standing in a line with them, your eye keeps coming back to her. She's got Brit DNA and American character. She's sassy. And it doesn't hurt that she's got a great build. 
A cool part, also a build story: The hemi-shaped ignition cover came about when Tony, Ryan (Gepetto) and I agreed the existing off-the-shelf finned ignition cover wouldn't do.  That spawned a build off between Tony and Ryan that gave me two covers to choose from. I selected Tony's hemi, but would have been fortunate to have either one. In fact the fickle SOB that I am, I wanted Ryan's until seeing Tony's.
To repeat special thanks, you have to figure you lead a charmed life when you run into guys that enthusiastic about what they do. And you have to feel privileged that they focus that enthusiasm on something for you.
Thanks to: 
From Tony and the crew at Classic Cycles, a special thanks Steve and his wife Cayce for allowing us to build a bike like this.
You can view the build films on youtube by searching for (TR6 build) or follow the links on our web site
www.ClassicCyclesInc.com
 

Owner: Steve Lacy- Long Beach, CA 

Builder: Classic Cycles Inc, Orange, CA

Bike name: "Brown Sugar"

Engine, year and make, model, modifications: 1964 Triumph TR6/650ccAndy added a 1969 Intake Cam and 1970 Exhaust cam for a bit snappier response.Clutch and primary belt drive from Bob Newby Racing installed. Drive-side cover opened precisely over the pressure plate. It got a brushed finish, topped off with polished nuts. Tony shaved, heated, bent and braised BSA A65 pipes so they would replace the stock exhaust. Then the head ends were flanged to fit the Triumph spigots. Steve requested a 21-tooth drive sprocket in the transmission. Oil feed to the rockers features exposed brass junction and fittings. Rocker box fin edges are polished.

Frame: Flyrite Loner- 4" over. Steve wanted a 19/400 tires on 19-inch wheels front and back. So something had to give at the rear. The cross member under the seat was scooped out so the fender could move forward and allow that larger radius. That cavity was also used to hide a fender attachment. The frame’s axle plates were modified to take Triumph axle and chain adjusters. 

Fork: It's a one-of-a-kind springer that started as a "Shorty" manufactured by DNA for Flyright Choppers. A lot of sweat went into the cutting, milling, scaling, and modifying needed for the transformation. Tony also fabbed an elegant stainless brake stay to connect the fork with a 7" twin leading shoe brake hub. Welding, polishing and plating made the rocker/stay combo a handsome, integrated component. Finally, Tony moved the rockers from outside to inside the fork legs to flesh out that interior space.

Chassis mods: Extensive shaping and molding as well as rear axle plate modifications for Triumph style rear axle. and the stylized gas  and oil tank mounts and custom head steady.

Tire/wheel size and style: 400/19 Firestone's front and rear on Triumph hubs.

Favorite things about this bike: The theme of the sweeping BSA exhaust pipes was carried out through many of the design features, like the hand made points cover the custom motor mounts and even the gussets on the gas and oil tank mounts and the sweeping lines of the paint design.  I like the 7" Twin leading shoe mounted on a  springer, the Bob Newby belt drive in a open primary cover, the no battery electronics with a micro switch brake light switch and the LED tail light.  the Hollywood handle bars, also the custom "1950's Smiths Revolater" speedometer and mount, the look and the feel of custom made Roberti seat with a Biltwell seat mount, I like some of the little touches like the exposed brass fittings on the oil feed, and the petcocks on a Bonneville gas tank with knee pads.This bike has lots of high quality paint work with minimum amount of chrome and then keeping the engine in a clean stock appearance with tiny custom touches like the polished edges on the head and rockerboxes.

Next modification will be: Chips and dings from the owner riding the hell out of it.

Other mods, accessories, cool parts, etc: Tony routed electrical wiring through the frame for a clean appearance. The battery got tossed by using a Boyer Power Box. It provides direct current straight from the alternator. A built-in delay circuit only sends current to the lighting only once the engine is running and the ignition is fully powered. A Smiths chronometric speedometer with a revulator face plate is fitted to a custom mount fabricated by Classic Cycles. (absent in these photos). Triumph front fender mounts were joined with hand-shaped round stock to create a fender strut that suggests the appearance of a factory original.

T Markus Customs in N. Hollywood did the killer paint job. Markus did a great job of "dialing in" Steve's ideas to deliver a really tasteful finish on the bike.  

A couple notes from Steve, about his bike: She's like the girl who's pretty, but not in a conventional way. She doesn't dress like the popular girls either. But standing in a line with them, your eye keeps coming back to her. She's got Brit DNA and American character. She's sassy. And it doesn't hurt that she's got a great build. More backstory: The hemi-shaped ignition cover came about when Tony, Ryan (Gepetto) and I agreed the existing off-the-shelf finned ignition cover wouldn't do. That spawned a build-off between Tony and Ryan that gave me two covers to choose from. I selected Tony's hemi, but would have been fortunate to have either one. In fact the fickle SOB that I am, I wanted Ryan's until seeing Tony's.

To repeat special thanks, you have to figure you lead a charmed life when you run into guys that enthusiastic about what they do. And you have to feel privileged that they focus that enthusiasm on something for you.

From Tony and the crew at Classic Cycles, a special thanks Steve and his wife Cayce for allowing us to build a bike like this. You can view the build films on youtube by searching for (TR6 build) or follow the links on our web site www.ClassicCyclesInc.com Paint by Tony Markus: www.tmarkus.com 

Note: As usual, clicking on any of the slideshow images will bring up a new window with a larger photo.


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Comment with Chopcult (25)

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 11:59 am
 

Great job Classic Cycles! Great job indeed!!! Your shop is on my list of places to visit when I come to SoCal!!!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 12:03 pm
 

PERFECT, great Job

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 02:01 pm
 

just awesome

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 02:59 pm
 

The good ones look so simple but saw this in the process. Great Job!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 03:17 pm
 

Everything is so clean and thought out, great lookin bike.

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 06:07 pm
 

this bike gives me wood!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 06:12 pm
 

Simply a beautiful bike.

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 06:48 pm
 

awesome.....!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 06:50 pm
 

only a guy/girl who knows would be able to truly appreceate this bike fully. i don't and still love it!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 07:32 pm
 

Nice job! Love the front brake hub. Very clean looking.

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 09:09 pm
 

Thanks for all the props guys. We even got the "Best use of safety wire" award from Wes @ Four Aces. .....

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 09:54 pm
 

Outstanding!!

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 10:18 pm
 

Flawless! So clean you could eat off of it, but not without cleaning your plate, it's too nice to leave crumbs...

Commented on 3-22-2010 At 11:06 pm
 

Very Very nice!

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 01:10 am
 

Classy piece of metal heh?

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 01:56 am
 

I love those bars on a springer. I was thinking about a crossbar on set of bars for glide, but I'm not sure it will work.

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 04:32 am
 

Perfect. It could be done different, but certainly not better

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 06:29 am
 

wow that is clean, I thought the image in the header was a computer rendering at first glance.

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 09:53 am
 

I know it has been said but that bike is just awesome. Its inspiring and one of my favorites.

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 03:43 pm
 

Thanks for all the nice words being said. It's funny how the bike was never suppose to be THIS NICE. It was going to be just a nice clean bike and then the ideas started bouncing back and forth. I think if we didn't have a goal with a fixed ending, we could still be changing and fine tuning the details! Don't worry Steve, I've been seeing my therapist about the points cover that got rejected, but i'll be cool. And don't bother checking for videos of this bike being jumped! Congrat's Steve!!

Commented on 3-23-2010 At 11:15 pm
 

This bike just plain rocks... and I love the fact that you are going to ride the piss out of it. Good on ya.

Commented on 3-24-2010 At 04:07 am
 

Much respect!!! I dig this bike and the others bike u have built. Keep it 100.

Commented on 3-25-2010 At 03:14 am
 

Great stuff. So many awesome features.

Commented on 3-25-2010 At 05:08 am
 

That is one fine piece of machinery!

Commented on 3-30-2010 At 04:08 pm
 

Very nice indeed.

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